FIRST AID for the Obstetrics & Gynecology Clerkship Third Edition Ebook PDF download

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FIRST AID for the Obstetrics & Gynecology Clerkship Third Edition Ebook PDF download

FIRST AID for the Obstetrics & Gynecology Clerkship Third Edition Ebook PDF download

FIRST AID for the Obstetrics & Gynecology Clerkship Third Edition Ebook PDF download Most OB/GYN teams begin rounding between 5 and 7 AM. If you are expected to “pre-round,” you should give yourself at least 10 minutes per patient that you are following to see the patient and learn about the events that occurred overnight. Like all working professionals, you will face occasional obstacles to punctuality, but make sure this is infrequent. When you fi rst start a rotation, try to show up at least 15 minutes early until you get the routine fi gured out.

Dress in a Professional Manner
Even if the resident wears scrubs and the attending wears stiletto heels, you
must dress in a professional, conservative manner. Wear a short white coat  over your clothes unless discouraged (as in pediatrics). Recommended attire
(professional vs. scrubs) can vary based on rotation, so it is a question that
should be addressed to the team on the fi rst day of the rotation.

Men should wear long pants, with cuffs covering the ankle, dress shoes,
a long-sleeved collared shirt, and a tie. No jeans, no sneakers, no short-
sleeved shirts. Facial hair should be well groomed.

Women should wear long pants or knee-length skirt, and a top with a modest
neckline. No jeans, no sneakers, no heels greater than 1½ inches, no open-
toed shoes.

Both men and women may wear scrubs occasionally, during overnight call
or in the operating room or birthing ward. You never know what to expect
on labor and delivery, so as a general guideline, always keep a spare pair of
scrubs available on your hospital-issued scrub card.

Act in a Pleasant Manner The rotation is often diffi cult, stressful, and tiring. You will have a smoother  experience if you are nice to be around. Be friendly and try to learn everyone’s  name. If you do not understand or disagree with a treatment plan or diagnosis,  do not “challenge.” Instead, say, “I’m sorry, I don’t quite understand, could you please explain? …”
Be aware of your demeanor and reactions. It is always good to approach each
rotation with an open mind, but there will be times when you are bored or
just not in the mood. Try to look interested to attendings and residents. When  someone is trying to teach you something, be respectful and look grateful, not
tortured.

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