Nurse’s Quick Check Fluids & Electrolytes Ebook PDF

0
147

Nurse’s Quick Check Fluids & Electrolytes Ebook PDF

Nurse’s Quick  Check Fluids & Electrolytes PDF
Nurse’s Quick Check Fluids & Electrolytes8 PDF

Nurse’s Quick Check Fluids & Electrolytes Ebook PDF Fluid tonicity
Isotonic solutions is Designed for quick reference in the hospital hallway or at the nurses’ station, this handbook presents succinct, bulleted, up-to-the-minute information on fluid and electrolyte homeostasis and common fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base imbalances. Part 1 provides a rapid refresher on key facts nurses need to evaluate assessment findings related to fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Part 2 contains entries on imbalances, which are are alphabetically organized and presented on easy-to-scan two-page spreads. Numerous tables and illustrations are included. Logos highlight potentially dangerous situations and complications and age-related concerns.

  •  A solute is a substance that’s dissolved in a solvent.
  • Together, they make a solution. An isotonic solution has the same solute concentra-tion as another solution to which it’s being com-pared.
  • Normal saline solution is an example of an isotonic solution; its concentration of sodium nearly equalsthe concentration of sodium in blood. (See Under-standing isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic so-lutions.)
  • If two fluids in adjacent compartments have equal concentrations of a certain solute — if they’re isoonic, in other words — the fluid in each compartment stays where it is.
    A balanced solute concentration means no net shift in fluid.
  • Hypotonic solutions : A hypotonic solution has a lower solute concentration than another solution to which it’s being compared.

❍ If one solution contains only a little sodium and another solution contains more sodium, the first solution is hypotonic compared with the second solution.
❍ Half-normal saline solution is an example of a hypotonic solution; its concentration of sodium is lower than the concentration of sodium in blood.

❍ The body constantly seeks to maintain a state of balance, or equilibrium. As a result, fluid from the hypotonic solution shifts into the more concentrated solution until the two solutions have equal concentrations of solutes.

Hypertonic solutions

❍ A hypertonic solution has a higher solute concentration than another solution to which it’s being compared.
❍ For instance, say one solution contains a largeamount of sodium and a second solution containsmuch less sodium. The first solution is hypertoniccompared with the second solution.
❍ Dextrose 5% in normal saline solution is an example of a hypertonic solution because the concentration
of solutes in the solution is greater than the concentration of solutes in blood.
❍ Because the body seeks equilibrium, fluid from theless concentrated solution will move into the hypertonic solution until the two solutions contain equalconcentrations of solutes.

Nurse’s Quick Check Fluids & Electrolytes Ebook PDF