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Oxford Handbook of Clinical Surgery Fourth edition eBook Free Download

Oxford Handbook of Clinical Surgery Fourth edition eBook Free Download

Oxford Handbook of Clinical  Surgery  Fourth edition eBook Free Download

Oxford Handbook of Clinical Surgery Fourth edition eBook Free Download The idea of this book was fi rst suggested by Mr Gordon McBain, consultant surgeon at the Southern General Hospital, Glasgow. We have received considerable support from the staff of Oxford University Press, and are
also indebted to Mr J. Rhind and Dr J. Daniel for their contributions and  our surgical teachers, especially Mr J. S. F. Hutchison, Mr M. K. Browne, Mr J. Neilson, Mr D. Young, Mr A. Young, and the late Mr I. McLennan
whose practical advice and anecdotes pepper the page.

Patients have a right to expect that information about them will be held  in confi dence by their doctors. Confi dentiality is central to trust between  doctors and patients. Without assurances about confi dentiality, patients  may be reluctant to give doctors the information they need in order to  provide good care. The GMC states that if you are asked to provide information about patients, you must:
• Inform patients about the disclosure or check that they have already  received information about it.

Oxford Handbook of Clinical Surgery Fourth edition eBook Free Download

Anonymize data where unidentifi able data will serve the purpose (this
includes your surgical logbook).
• Keep disclosures to the minimum necessary.
• Keep up to date with and observe the requirements of statute and  common law, including data protection legislation.
Daily practice
• When you are responsible for personal information about patients,  you must make sure that it is effectively protected against improper  disclosure at all times (e.g. password-protected electronic fi les).

• Many improper disclosures are unintentional. You should not discuss  patients where you can be overheard or leave patients’ records,  either on paper or on screen, where they can be seen by other  patients, unauthorized health care staff, or the public. You should take  all reasonable steps to ensure your consultations with patients are  private.
• Patients have a right to information about the health care services  available to them presented in a way that is easy to follow and use.

Special circumstances
If in any doubt, contact your medical defence union for advice.
• You must disclose information to satisfy a specifi c statutory
requirement, such as notifi cation of a known or suspected
communicable disease. Inform patients about such disclosures,
wherever that is practicable, but their consent is not required.

• You must also disclose information if ordered to do so by a judge or  presiding offi cer of a court. You should object if attempts are made to  compel you to disclose what appear to you to be irrelevant matters.
• You must not disclose personal information to a third party, such as  a solicitor, police offi cer, or offi cer of a court, without the patient’s express consent, except when:
• The patient is not competent to give consent.
• Reasonable efforts to trace patients are unlikely to be successful.
• The patient has been or may be violent, or obtaining consent
would undermine the purpose of the disclosure (e.g. disclosures in
relation to crime).

• Action must be taken quickly (e.g. in the detection or control of
outbreaks of some communicable diseases) and there is insuffi cient
time to contact patients.

Oxford Handbook of Clinical Surgery Fourth edition eBook Free Download

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