Cambridge Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury 5th Edition

Cambridge Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury 5th Edition

Cambridge Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury 5th Edition Since publication of the first edition of this text in 1989,
a great deal has been written regarding the issues of neonatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in term and near-term infants. These papershave addressed the incidence, etiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome, often relating outcomes to the development of cerebral palsy (CP) and/or intellectual disability in survivors [1–29].

Much of the understanding of the pathophysiology has been the result of studies carried out in laboratory animals, which have been extrapolated to the human fetus and newborn. Additional studies of complications and out come have been population based, comparing the injured infant with carefully selected normal control individuals.

Cambridge Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury 5th Edition

These studies have added a great deal to our understanding of risk factors for brain injury and have enhanced our ability to predict and identify brain injury with increasing accuracy. This precision has become increasingly important as newer modalities of treatment have evolved that require even more precision in the early identification of these infants so that the validity of these therapies can be ascertained.

Since publication of the latest edition of this text, there have also been numerous randomized trials and meta-analyses on the use of therapeutic hypothermia as treatment for neonatal encephalopathy [30–39]. As can be seen in Chapters 39, 41, and 42, early institution of treatment becomes of paramount importance if an improved outcome is to be achieved. However, neonatal encephalopathy continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally
despite these new efforts to reduce its impact.

Cambridge Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury 5th Edition

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