CLINICAL MEDICINE BOOKS

Embryology at a Glance 2nd Edition 2018

AT A GLANCE SERIES

Embryology at a Glance 2nd Edition 2018

Embryology at a Glance 2nd Edition 2018

Embryology at a Glance 2nd Edition 2018Our biological development is a fascinating subject deserving  study for interest’s sake alone. Anunderstanding of embryological  development also helps us answer questions about our adult anatomy, why congenital abnormalities sometimes occur and gives us

insights into where we come from. In medicine the importance of  an understanding of normal development quickly becomes clear as  a student begins to make the same links between embryology, .anatomy, physiology and neonatal medicine. The study of embryology has been documented as far back as  the sixth century bc when the chicken egg was noted as a perfect way of studying development. Aristotle (384–322 bc) compared   preformationism and epigenetic theories of development.

Why study embryology?

Do animals begin in a preformed way, merely becoming larger, or do  they form from something much simpler, developing the struc- tures and systems of the adult in time? From studies of chickens’  eggs of different days of incubation and comparisons with the  embryos of other animals Aristotle favoured epigenetic theory,  noting similarities between the embryos of humans and other  animals in very early stages. In a chicken’s egg, a beating heart can  be observed with the naked eye before much else of the chicken  has formed. Aristotle’s views directed the field of embryology until the  invention of the light microscope in the late 1500s. From theno onwardsembryology as a field of study was developed.

 

Embryology at a Glance 2nd Edition 2018
A common problem that students face when studying embryology is the apparent complexity of the topic. Cells change names,  the vocabulary seems vast, shapes form, are named and renamed,  and not only are there structures to be concerned with but also the  changes to those structures with time. In anatomy, structures  acquire new names as they move to a new place or pass another  structure (e.g. the external iliac artery passes deep to the inguinal  ligament and becomes the femoral artery).

In embryology, cells  acquire new names when they differentiate to become more specialised or group together in a new place; structures have new  names when they move, change shape or new  structures form  around them. With time and study students discover these processes, just as they discover anatomical structures.

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Embryology at a Glance 2nd Edition 2018

 

 

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